O-SHiN is a Musical Revelation

In an all-too-short set at Baketown Studios, O-SHiN proved that she is a natural born performer. With energy, charm—and above all else—some great tunes, she owned the intimate gig like a seasoned pro.

Tucked away in an old mechanics garage in Schöneberg is Baketown Studios, home to a music collective set up last year. They are putting out some great music, with “Willow Tree” by Alice Phoebe Lou and Bakery particularly worth a listen. The Studios are small as a venue, and there is a kitchen next to the audience. But overall it’s a fun place for a gig.

In the midst of this, O-SHiN performed a short but beautiful set. It’s near impossible to pigeon-hole her genre-bending music. Her first three songs roughly fit the label of electro-pop. But as though she was concerned that you might be able to define her, the music shifts completely, blasting any possible conclusions you had just come to. In the middle of “A Lie”—a soulful take on love—the band break straight into thumping Berlin-style techno. I think it’s safe to say she should fit in quite well in her new hometown.

Just as techno relies on the bass beat, snare, and offbeat high hat to give its intensity, O-SHiN’s music turns to her two percussionists for the bulk of the texture.

A surprise kick, no doubt. But the techno fits. It really does. It fits because all of the music is obsessively filled with intricate and overlapping rhythms. Just as techno relies on the bass beat, snare, and offbeat high hat to give its intensity, O-SHiN’s music turns to her two percussionists for the bulk of the texture. But the synth also plays a huge part in the rhythm of the pieces, posing as a third drummer at times. Even the guitar and upright bass acted as quasi-percussion at times. The result is dramatic and intense.

The stage looked a little like an antique shop filled with metal instruments and old curios.

Just as on her two singles—”A Revelation” and “Walking Water”—the live percussion doesn’t just rely on rhythm for interest. I would be lying if I said I could name every object used. The stage looked a little like an antique shop filled with metal instruments and old curios. But the thing is, when you see a singer rustle (what looks like) tin foil at the opening of a song, and your hair starts to stand on end… you know. You know that you are listening to something a bit different and more than a bit special.

The big negative (there had to be one) is that we still have to wait for more of her music. She is currently releasing her songs individually, with the next single out in February. This will be followed by an EP later in the Spring. Monday’s gig was filmed, so watch this space for when the footage becomes available.

Until then, you can listen to O-SHiN on Spotify.
Or follow her on Facebook.

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